• Gut Health
  • Heart Health
    • Heart Health

      The stats tell it all: The number one cause of death in the United States is heart disease. That’s right, more than any other disease – even cancer (a close second) – heart disease is the most likely to kill you. The United States is currently facing a “diabesity” epidemic, or a substantial increase in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome leading to diabetes and obesity, all serious risk factors for heart disease.

      According to the American Heart Association, every 34 seconds someone in the US dies of a heart attack. By the time you finish reading this paragraph, another person will have lost their life. Sadly, many people do not even know they have heart disease until they experience a heart attack. These facts alone make Heart Health a critical topic to understand.

  • Skin Health
    • Skin Health

      The gut-skin connection is very significant. Inflammatory processes present in the gut may manifest on the skin. Toxins are expelled with sweat, and can cause the skin to react. Like the inside of the digestive tract, the skin is covered in microbes which can be neutral, protective or pathogenic. Skin reaction may reflect what is going on inside the body. Therefore treating skin conditions only from the outside will often be ineffective and lead to other chronic issues.

  • Brain Health
    • Brain Health

      The gut-brain connection occurs in two directions—from the brain to the gut, and from the gut to the brain. When a person has a “gut feeling,” or an emotional upset causes a stomachache or loss of appetite, they experience examples of the first, most familiar direction. When the gut is out of balance, inflammation results leading to a condition commonly known as leaky gut. A leaky gut will allow undigested food particles and toxins to enter into the bloodstream. Some may cross into the brain, setting the stage for diseases like Alzheimers and dementia. Recognizing the underlying contributing factors that created the gut imbalance in the first place is the first step to achieving optimal brain function .

  • Diet & Health
    • Diet & Health

      Healthy pH levels, whether in the colon or systemic, are found when you eat a high-fiber diet, high in vegetables and fruits, healthy proteins, and healthy fats. Complement this with foods and supplements high in beneficial bacteria, omega-3 fatty acids, and digestive enzymes, and you will be supporting optimal health (which begins in the digestive system).

  • About Brenda
  • Pet Health
    • Pet Health

      Our dog’s health is precious! They provide us with unconditional love and companionship. A daily probiotic formula is a great way to ensure good health. Make sure you choose one that delivers the recommended potency level and strain count. There is nothing quite like a healthy and happy dog. Happy Dog. Happy Life!

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Is Your Best Friend Constipated?

Filed in Constipation, Diet, Digestive Health, Dogs - Pets, Exercise, Heart Disease, Joints, Omega-3 & Fish Oil, Probiotics & Gut Flora | Posted by Brenda Watson on 04/24/2015


Constipation may not be a topic you’d choose for daily conversation, but it’s really nothing to be embarrassed about. We’ve all experienced it at one time or another – and we realize how debilitating it can become. Although in our society, the medical professionals still say that 3 bowel movements weekly is “normal” – let me tell you, you don’t want to be “normal”. A healthy human being should eliminate daily. And it’s the same for our faithful canine companions.

Dogs also suffer from constipation. If your dog is showing signs of having trouble eliminating, take him to the vet to make sure there is not an underlying condition. If there’s not a physical problem, then it’s up to us, and what we provide as owners, to help our dogs eliminate better.

Dogs show signs of being constipated by straining to defecate – with small volume expelled. You may notice hard bowel movements. As I mentioned, dogs need to eliminate everyday to be healthy. They may also look bloated and/or show signs of pain when attempting to defecate. Lack of appetite or even depression could be a sign of toxic buildup or discomfort due to constipation. Be sure to notice any differences in color or texture.

Well, what exactly can we do at home to help our dogs? Making sure they eat a good diet with moist food – not just dry food – is a must. Supply your pet with plenty of clean water and exercise.

Certain supplements have also been shown to help. Just like people, dogs need the good bacteria from probiotics to balance their guts and help with regularity. Choose a supplement that is potent enough to make a difference – at least 20 billion cultures per serving (whether in pill or powder) and containing 10 different strains of lactobacillus and bifido bacteria. Dogs have many of the same strains of good bacteria in their gut as their owners so providing them with a high culture count and multi strain supplement is as important for them as it is for us.

Here’s another important tip that many may not know – Omega 3s, which vets suggest for many other problems in dogs like kidney, heart and joint diseases, is also very effective in relieving constipation. A high dose omega blend of EPA and DHA totaling about 750mg of total omega3 is best.

Chances are good that you regularly clean up as your dog eliminates. That poop helps you to notice any changes that may be occurring in your pet’s health. Our dogs are so willing to give us unconditional love – and we enjoy it thoroughly! However they depend on us totally for their digestive needs. Let’s make sure they have the same opportunities for vital health that we do!

 

Omega-3 Joint Benefits for Osteoarthritis

Filed in Joints, Omega-3 & Fish Oil | Posted by Brenda Watson on 08/15/2014


You may have heard that omega-3 fats are good for your joints—and you’re right, particularly when it comes to inflammation. Most studies investigating omega-3 for joint health have looked at rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease that causes inflammation in the joints. Omega-3 supplementation has been shown to reduce the need for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and reduce symptoms and inflammation in these patients.

A new study published in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases investigates the role of omega-3 fats on the other main type of arthritis—osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis affects about 27 million people in the United States and involves loss of cartilage in joints, which causes pain, stiffness, and loss of mobility.

In the study, the researchers used an animal model and administered three different diets: one high in saturated fat, one high in omega-6 fats, and one high in omega-6 fats with additional omega-3. Those diets high in saturated and omega-6 fats caused a worsening of arthritis while the diet with added omega-3 helped slow joint deterioration.

“While omega-3 fatty acids aren’t reversing the injury, they appear to slow the progression of arthritis in this group of mice,” stated Farshid Guilak, PhD. “In fact, omega-3 fatty acids eliminated the detrimental effects of obesity in obese mice.”

Next, the researchers plan to study the effects of omega-3 fats in people with osteoarthritis induced by injury. I look forward to the results.

Because osteoarthritis triggers inflammation, many integrative physicians recommend omega-3 fats for their benefits on inflammation. Omega-3s help to balance the inflammatory effects of a diet high in omega-6 (the reason the omega-6-rich diet in the study above made the arthritis worse). Many people have insufficient levels of omega-3 due to the high prevalence of omega-6 fats in the diet.

Eating fish high in omega-3 (salmon, sardines, and herring, for example) and taking a fish oil supplement while lowering omega-6 intake (replace your vegetable oils with olive or coconut oil) will help to balance your omega-3/6 ratio and promote healthy joints.