• Gut Health
  • Heart Health
    • Heart Health

      The stats tell it all: The number one cause of death in the United States is heart disease. That’s right, more than any other disease – even cancer (a close second) – heart disease is the most likely to kill you. The United States is currently facing a “diabesity” epidemic, or a substantial increase in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome leading to diabetes and obesity, all serious risk factors for heart disease.

      According to the American Heart Association, every 34 seconds someone in the US dies of a heart attack. By the time you finish reading this paragraph, another person will have lost their life. Sadly, many people do not even know they have heart disease until they experience a heart attack. These facts alone make Heart Health a critical topic to understand.

  • Skin Health
    • Skin Health

      The gut-skin connection is very significant. Inflammatory processes present in the gut may manifest on the skin. Toxins are expelled with sweat, and can cause the skin to react. Like the inside of the digestive tract, the skin is covered in microbes which can be neutral, protective or pathogenic. Skin reaction may reflect what is going on inside the body. Therefore treating skin conditions only from the outside will often be ineffective and lead to other chronic issues.

  • Brain Health
    • Brain Health

      The gut-brain connection occurs in two directions—from the brain to the gut, and from the gut to the brain. When a person has a “gut feeling,” or an emotional upset causes a stomachache or loss of appetite, they experience examples of the first, most familiar direction. When the gut is out of balance, inflammation results leading to a condition commonly known as leaky gut. A leaky gut will allow undigested food particles and toxins to enter into the bloodstream. Some may cross into the brain, setting the stage for diseases like Alzheimers and dementia. Recognizing the underlying contributing factors that created the gut imbalance in the first place is the first step to achieving optimal brain function .

  • Diet & Health
    • Diet & Health

      Healthy pH levels, whether in the colon or systemic, are found when you eat a high-fiber diet, high in vegetables and fruits, healthy proteins, and healthy fats. Complement this with foods and supplements high in beneficial bacteria, omega-3 fatty acids, and digestive enzymes, and you will be supporting optimal health (which begins in the digestive system).

  • About Brenda
  • Pet Health
    • Pet Health

      Our dog’s health is precious! They provide us with unconditional love and companionship. A daily probiotic formula is a great way to ensure good health. Make sure you choose one that delivers the recommended potency level and strain count. There is nothing quite like a healthy and happy dog. Happy Dog. Happy Life!

  • Blog
  • Shop

Children Not Getting Enough Omega-3

Filed in Allergies, Children, Digestive Health, General, Infancy, Obesity, Omega-3 & Fish Oil | Posted by Brenda Watson on 10/09/2013


The ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 in the Standard American Diet (SAD) is anywhere from 10:1 to 20:1. That means consumption of omega-6 fats is 10 to 20 times more than omega-3 fats in the SAD diet. This ratio should more like 2:1 to 4:1 in order to maintain healthy omega-3 levels. We’re simply eating far too many omega-6 fats and too few omega-3 fats.

A recent study published in the journal Maternal and Child Nutrition found that children aged 12 to 60 months eat a diet that puts their ratio at 10:1. Not an ideal ratio, to say the least. The researchers looked at data from 2,500 children in the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a nationally-representative sample of children, so we can conclude that the majority of US children are low in omega-3 fat intake.

“In addition, intake of a key fatty acid known as DHA in children 12 to 60 months of age was low—lower than what infants generally consume—and it did not increase with age,” stated Sarah Keim, PhD, lead researcher. “Only about 54 percent of children ate fish at least once in the previous month.”

The Institute of Medicine has set a “reasonable intake” level of two 3-oz servings of fish per week for children. “According to our research, however, children are clearly not consuming this much fish.”

In another recent study published in the Public Library of Sciences ONE journal, Oxford University researchers studied the omega-3 levels of 493 UK schoolchildren aged seven to nine years with below-average reading levels, and they found that the children’s total omega-3 fatty acid levels were 2.54 percent, which is well below healthy levels. “From a sample of nearly 500 schoolchildren, we found that levels of omega-3 fatty acids in the blood significantly predicted a child’s behavior and ability to learn. Higher levels of omega-3 in the blood, and DHA in particular, were associated with better reading and memory, as well as with fewer behavior problems as rated by parents and teachers,” stated co-author Paul Montgomery.

Intake of omega-3 fats should begin during pregnancy and continue through breastfeeding, when the mother provides these important fats for her infant. After weaning, omega-3 intake must come from the diet. Because low omega-3 levels have been linked to such conditions as ADHD, behavior and learning problems, allergies, obesity, and more, it is crucial that our children get enough of this essential fat. “Dietary habits can form very early, so starting with a balanced diet may have long-lasting effects for children’s health.”

A fish oil supplement specially formulated for children is a great way to increase omega-3 levels, especially if the child does not like fish or if you are concerned about the mercury content of certain fish.