• Gut Health
  • Heart Health
    • Heart Health

      The stats tell it all: The number one cause of death in the United States is heart disease. That’s right, more than any other disease – even cancer (a close second) – heart disease is the most likely to kill you. The United States is currently facing a “diabesity” epidemic, or a substantial increase in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome leading to diabetes and obesity, all serious risk factors for heart disease.

      According to the American Heart Association, every 34 seconds someone in the US dies of a heart attack. By the time you finish reading this paragraph, another person will have lost their life. Sadly, many people do not even know they have heart disease until they experience a heart attack. These facts alone make Heart Health a critical topic to understand.

  • Skin Health
    • Skin Health

      The gut-skin connection is very significant. Inflammatory processes present in the gut may manifest on the skin. Toxins are expelled with sweat, and can cause the skin to react. Like the inside of the digestive tract, the skin is covered in microbes which can be neutral, protective or pathogenic. Skin reaction may reflect what is going on inside the body. Therefore treating skin conditions only from the outside will often be ineffective and lead to other chronic issues.

  • Brain Health
    • Brain Health

      The gut-brain connection occurs in two directions—from the brain to the gut, and from the gut to the brain. When a person has a “gut feeling,” or an emotional upset causes a stomachache or loss of appetite, they experience examples of the first, most familiar direction. When the gut is out of balance, inflammation results leading to a condition commonly known as leaky gut. A leaky gut will allow undigested food particles and toxins to enter into the bloodstream. Some may cross into the brain, setting the stage for diseases like Alzheimers and dementia. Recognizing the underlying contributing factors that created the gut imbalance in the first place is the first step to achieving optimal brain function .

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Skin Health


sub_skinThe skin is an organ that covers the body, a protective layer separating the internal organs and structures from the outer environment. It is comprised of an outer, waterproof layer (the epidermis), and an inner layer (the dermis). Consisting of hair follicles, sweat glands, nerve endings, and capillaries transporting blood, the skin plays a vital role in shielding the body from pathogens and environmental substances, and in releasing toxins through sweat.

The gut-skin connection is an indirect one, but is, nonetheless, a significant connection. If there is inflammation present in the gut, whether chronic, low-grade or acute, it triggers more inflammation in the bloodstream which travels throughout the body, manifesting in different areas. Sometimes the inflammation is brought to the skin. In addition, toxins are expelled with sweat through the skin, and can cause the skin to react. Furthermore, like the inside of the digestive tract, the skin is covered in microbes which can be neutral, protective or pathogenic.

A skin reaction reflects what is going on inside the body. Instead of viewing the problem from the outside, and, hence, treating it from the outside, taking a look at how the digestive system functions, and how that function affects the entire body will provide a more comprehensive viewpoint from which to begin healing the conditions that affect the skin.

 

Acne

Acne

What Is It? Acne vulgaris, known simply as acne, is a common skin disease. Acne affects the areas of the skin that have the greatest concentration of sebaceous glands (or oil glands). These glands secrete sebum, an oily, waxy substance that helps to lubricate and protect the skin. In normal skin, the oil produced by […]

Eczema

Eczema (Dermatitis)

What Is It? Eczema is a general term describing skin inflammation, also known as dermatitis. There are many different forms of eczema, the most common being atopic eczema (atopic dermatitis). Contact eczema (contact dermatitis) and seborrheic eczema (seborrheic dermatitis) are two other forms that occur commonly and will be discussed here. Atopic eczema is a […]

Psoriasis

Psoriasis

What Is It? Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease which produces thickened, inflamed skin covered with silvery scales. This occurs because the cells of the epidermis, or the outer skin layer, are shed at a much faster rate than normal skin. Normally, skin is regenerated once a month. In people with psoriasis, the skin regenerates […]

Rosacea

Rosacea

What Is It?   Rosacea is a chronic skin disorder that affects the central area of the face—usually the nose, cheeks, chin and forehead. Untreated, it usually worsens over time, being a progressive disease. Rosacea has been categorized into four subtypes, based on features that often occur together. These subtypes are as follows: 1. Erythematotelangiectatic […]