Tag: bacteria

Daily Fiber Flush with the Skinny Gut Diet

I recently had the opportunity to discuss the connection between weight loss and gut bacterial balance with Dr. Oz for an upcoming segment that will air on his show on October 23. Inside your digestive tract live 100 trillion bacteria that play a vital role in maintaining your digestive and overall health. As it turns out, the balance of these…

The Immune Effects of Breastfeeding vs Bottle Feeding

Early life events, such as mode of delivery at birth, antibiotic use, and diet, all play a big role in what bacteria develop in the intestinal tract, which, in turn, determines how healthy an individual will be. In a recent study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, researchers from UC Davis and UC San Francisco compared breastfed and bottle-fed…

Gut Bacteria in Premature Infants Depends on Age

Not long ago, researchers thought that infants in the womb were free of bacteria. Infants are inoculated by bacteria during birth, and later by the environment and diet, they said, but not before birth. In 2005, that idea changed when bacteria was discovered inside the umbilical cord. Last spring, the idea was really put to death when researchers discovered that…

Gut Bacteria Balance is in Flux

The 100 trillion bacteria that live inside the human digestive tract are the subject of many studies currently underway. Researchers the world over are trying to figure out which microbes constitute a “healthy microbiome,” which microbes protect our health, and which cause disease. Many advances have already been made, but there is still much we don’t know about the creatures…

Overactive Bladder? Bacteria May Be to Blame

Until recently, it was thought that the bladder—and therefore urine—is sterile, meaning that, in a healthy state, no bacteria live there. But a new study presented by researchers at the General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology is changing how scientists view the urinary system. Using an expanded culture technique able to detect bacteria that standard techniques do not,…

Bacteria and the Skin

When someone talks about the bacteria that are found in and on the human body, the conversation usually turns to the gut because that is where the majority of these microbes are found. But the skin is an often overlooked habitat for a large diversity of microbes that are only recently being recognized as important for human health. In a…

Human Placenta Contains a Community of Microbes

The human microbiome is vast, accounting for 90 percent of our cells. Microbial composition varies from site to site across a range of niches in and on the body. Some niches—such as the colon—are colonized by a very high number of microbes. Other niches—such as the stomach—are colonized by lower amount of microbes. There are yet other areas of the…

Heard the One about the Sausage Made from Baby Poop?

No, it isn’t the latest joke, though chances are you have heard the story in the news. But let me just clear something up: there is no actual poop in a new type of “gourmet” sausage developed recently by scientists in Spain—just a beneficial strain of bacteria commonly found in (you guessed it!) baby poop. For those of us with…

Fiber, Gut Microbes, and Inflammation

When you consider that the human colon houses many trillions of bacteria, you have to wonder at the immune system’s complexity. The intestinal lining houses the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), which makes up the majority of your immune system. And yet, even though the only separation between these bacteria and the immune system is a one-cell thick layer called the…