Tag: Bifidobacteria

Gut Bacteria Balance is in Flux

The 100 trillion bacteria that live inside the human digestive tract are the subject of many studies currently underway. Researchers the world over are trying to figure out which microbes constitute a “healthy microbiome,” which microbes protect our health, and which cause disease. Many advances have already been made, but there is still much we don’t know about the creatures…

Changes in Gut Microbes of Infants Greater than We Thought

It has generally been considered that an infant’s gut microbial composition resembles that of an adult by the age of about 12 months. Gut bacterial composition during the first year of life is in flux, with great variation seen between infants and even within the same infant over time. A recent study is changing how we view the early establishment…

Prebiotics Alter Microbiota and Modify Brain Chemistry—More Gut-Brain Connection Evidence

Prebiotics are soluble fibers that feed beneficial bacteria and lead to an increase in those bacteria along with a decrease in potentially harmful bacteria. Prebiotics can be found in food, certain fiber supplements, and in prebiotic supplements (which are fiber supplements, by nature, although may not be labeled as such). A recent study published in the journal Neurochemistry International found…

Butyrate and the Immune System

Some of your gut bacteria—especially the beneficial Bifidobacteria—produce an important short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) called butyrate. They do this by fermenting fiber in the digestive tract. Butyrate acts as a food for the cells of the intestinal lining, helping to maintain the integrity of this one-cell-thick layer that separates the digestive system from the rest of the body. A recent…

Cesarean Section Linked to Increased Risk of Obesity Later in Life

The rate of cesarean-section births in many countries is over 15 percent, and in some settings, cesarean delivery has become more common than vaginal delivery. Cesarean-section birth is medically necessary in many cases, but not in all cases. A recent meta-analysis published in the International Journal of Obesity found that cesarean section is associated with a 33 percent increased risk…

Breastfeeding May Protect Against ADHD

Breastfeeding, when possible, is one of the best ways for a mother to give her infant a healthy head start in life. Babies who are breast fed establish a healthy balance of bacteria in their intestines, rich in beneficial bifidobacteria. An early diet of nature’s perfect food confers a number of benefits to the recipient babies, including possible protection against…

Probiotics for Oral Health

The digestive tract is usually thought of as the esophagus, stomach, and intestines, but it actually begins right in the mouth, where digestion begins. The entire digestive tract, beginning in the mouth, is colonized by microbes. After the colon, the highest count of bacteria per gram is found in the mouth. Just as it’s important to maintain a balance of…

The Stress Factor and Your Heart

It’s true that just about everyone is stressed these days. Our lives are packed with things to do, places to be, and then more things to do. We are constantly on the move with little down time to help us recuperate. And sleep? It’s usually cut short to make time for something else seemingly “more important.” This current pattern of…

The Gut-Brain, Gut-Immune Connection to Chronic Fatigue

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a condition often considered difficult to understand. The main characteristic of CFS is persistent and relapsing fatigue, usually worsened by physical and mental exertion. It also involves neuropsychological symptoms including loss of memory or concentration, headaches, sleep disturbances, depression, and anxiety. Of these symptoms, depression and anxiety are the most common with about half of…