Tag: Bifidobacterium

Mother’s Prenatal Stress Affects Infant’s Gut Bacteria

A number of studies have linked stress during pregnancy to premature birth and low birth weight, eczema, asthma, skin condition, and general illness as well as anxiety, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and impaired cognitive and psychomotor development.1 The reasons for these associations is not completely understood. Some researchers believe that gut microbes play a role. Intestinal microbes affect the development…

Probiotics and Vitamin C Reduce Colds and School Absences

Research continues to show that probiotics promote immune health. In particular, they have been found to have a beneficial effect on upper respiratory tract infections, which include cold and flu. Up to 80 percent of your immune system resides in the gut, so it’s not surprising that gut bacteria play a major role in immune health. A recent study published…

Probiotics for the Common Cold

Probiotics, or beneficial bacteria, have been studied for a number of health conditions, but one of the most exciting benefits of probiotics is their effect on the common cold. A number of studies have looked at probiotic treatment and prevention of upper respiratory tract infections (cold and flu, most notably). A recent systematic review evaluated data from twelve randomized, controlled…

Gut Microbes Responsible for Chocolate’s Healthy Effects

One of the best things about chocolate—dark chocolate, at least—is that it’s good for you. Chocolate is known to have a number of health-promoting qualities, including heart and brain health benefits. In a recent study presented at the National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, researchers discussed their findings that certain gut microbes are responsible for some of…

Almonds—The Next Prebiotic

Almonds have a newly found prebiotic benefit, according to a recent study published in the journal Anaerobe. That crunchy, healthy nut you love is even better for you than you thought. Both almonds and almond skins were found to increase beneficial Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus while also reducing levels of the potential pathogen Clostridium perfringens. The study involved 48 healthy young…

Heard the One about the Sausage Made from Baby Poop?

No, it isn’t the latest joke, though chances are you have heard the story in the news. But let me just clear something up: there is no actual poop in a new type of “gourmet” sausage developed recently by scientists in Spain—just a beneficial strain of bacteria commonly found in (you guessed it!) baby poop. For those of us with…

Probiotics Reduce Bowel Disease in Premature Babies

Premature infants given a daily dose of a probiotic blend were protected against the more severe forms of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a potentially deadly inflammatory disease, according to a recent study published in the journal Pediatrics. NEC is the most common gastrointestinal emergency in premature infants. It involves damage to the intestinal lining that ranges from surface damage all the…

Multi-strain Probiotic Reduces Risk of Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea

A multi-strain probiotic has been found to reduce the risk of antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) and reduce gastrointestinal symptoms in hospitalized patients taking antibiotics according to a recent study published in the journal Vaccine. The formulation contained four strains of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus and was taken daily up to seven days after the final antibiotic dosage. Those patients taking a higher…

Probiotics for the Mind—Psychobiotics

Use of probiotics to benefit mood is a recent advancement in the scientific literature, first proposed in 2005 when researchers suggested its use as an adjuvant treatment (add-on treatment) to standard care for major depressive disorder.1 In 2013, scientists defined psychobiotic as, “a live organism that, when ingested in adequate amounts, produces a health benefit in patients suffering from psychiatric…

How Rich are Your Gut Bacteria?

There are more factors that contribute to the development of obesity and related conditions than simply what we eat and how much energy we expend. The very notion of calories in, calories out is not what it seems; at least, not at face value. As researchers are discovering, your gut microbes have more to do with your metabolism than you…