Tag: BPA

Cash Register Receipts Major Source of BPA Exposure

If you are like most people, you receive cash register receipts on a regular basis. You may or may not know that those receipts are made of a special type of thermal paper that contains high amounts of the hormone disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA). In a study recently published in the Public Library of Sciences ONE journal, researchers discovered…

Prenatal BPA Exposure Linked to Poor Lung Function in Children

Asthma rates in children have been climbing over the last thirty years, and experts have identified a number of environmental pollutants, such as tobacco smoke and airborne pollutants, as risk factors for the disease. Some researchers have added the hormone-disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA) to the list of potential risk factors for the development of asthma. In a recent study…

Beware of the BPA Substitute

You have likely heard of bisphenol A (BPA), the hormone disrupting chemical found in many plastics. In fact, you may even purchase ‘BPA-free’ plastics in an effort to minimize your exposure to BPA. Many of us do. But you might want to rethink your approach based on some new research. The chemical that manufacturers use to replace BPA is BPS,…

EPA to Take a Closer Look at Risk of Low-level Toxin Exposure

Last March, a group of scientists published a report calling for more investigation into the potentially harmful effects of exposure to low levels of endocrine disruptors, such as bisphenol A (BPA). “Current testing paradigms are missing important, sensitive endpoints” for human health, stated the report. “The effects of low doses cannot be predicted by the effects observed at high doses.…

Obese Children and Teens Have Higher Levels of BPA

I blog often about the chemical bisphenol A, commonly known as BPA, because it is a harmful toxin found just about everywhere. Sure, the FDA has succeeded in removing it from baby bottles and sippy cups, but what about the effects of this toxin on older children and even adults? A recent study published in the Journal of the American…

Environmental Estrogens Affect Women’s Health

Environmental estrogens are those chemicals that mimic estrogen in the body when ingested from outside sources. Chemicals that mimic estrogen—and there are many—are known as endocrine disrupting chemicals because they interfere with hormone (endocrine) function. Examples of estrogen mimicking chemicals include many pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides, plasticizers like bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates, certain pharmaceuticals, and industrial chemicals.1 Heavy metals,…