Tag: breastfeeding

Breastfeeding May Protect Against ADHD and Improve IQ

The beneficial effects of breastfeeding are many. Children who are breastfed are at less risk of developing ear infections, colds, asthma, obesity, diabetes, and even leukemia.1 Breastfeeding has also been linked to improved brain development and lower risk for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and other behavioral problems. Because ADHD and other behavioral problems are also linked to the child’s IQ—which…

Immature Microbes in the Guts of Malnourished Children

Malnutrition (severe or moderate acute malnutrition) affects 23 percent of children in developing countries.1 The World Health Organization estimates that malnutrition is the cause of one-third of all child deaths.2 Malnutrition, or inadequate nutrition, manifests most noticeably as delayed growth, but also includes deficiencies in vitamins, minerals, essential fatty acids, and protein. A recently developed intervention for severe acute malnutrition,…

Breastfeeding Protective against Obesity When Follow-Up Diet is Healthy

Although many studies have linked breastfeeding to a protection against obesity, not all studies agree. A recent paper published in The Journal of Pediatrics sought to determine why this might be. They considered one important factor that previous studies had not—the quality of the diet following breastfeeding. When taking this important factor into consideration, they found that breastfeeding is protective…

Changes in Gut Microbes of Infants Greater than We Thought

It has generally been considered that an infant’s gut microbial composition resembles that of an adult by the age of about 12 months. Gut bacterial composition during the first year of life is in flux, with great variation seen between infants and even within the same infant over time. A recent study is changing how we view the early establishment…

Breastfeeding May Protect Against ADHD

Breastfeeding, when possible, is one of the best ways for a mother to give her infant a healthy head start in life. Babies who are breast fed establish a healthy balance of bacteria in their intestines, rich in beneficial bifidobacteria. An early diet of nature’s perfect food confers a number of benefits to the recipient babies, including possible protection against…

Early Infections May Increase Risk of Celiac Disease

Celiac disease is an autoimmune digestive condition in which the body’s immune system damages the villi (fingerlike projections) of the small intestine in response to the presence of gluten, found in wheat, barley, rye, and oats. This intestinal damage prevents the absorption of key nutrients important to health, eventually leading to malnourishment in untreated individuals. One in every 133 people…

The Effects of the Microbiome During Pregnancy and How Mother Can Improve It

It has now been established that breast milk, similar to the intestinal tract, has its own microbiome containing possibly hundreds of bacterial species. In addition, breast milk produces its own indigestible sugars called oligosaccharides that babies cannot digest. These sugars become the food (prebiotics) for the bacteria residing in the breast tissue and milk. During breastfeeding these healthy bacteria relocate…

Breastfeeding and Celiac Disease

Renew You Challenge Let’s start this week off right! Weekly challenge (I mean opportunity!) to help set you off on the right foot and in the right direction for bringing health to your week. You could even add it to your calendar. Join us! The risk of celiac disease might be lessened in infants who are breast fed, according to…

Bifidobacterium for Childhood Constipation

 Constipation is a common childhood condition, unfortunately. Even worse is the mainstream definition of constipation—less than three bowel movements per week. Say what! If you or little Johnny are only pooping three times a week, we’ve got a problem. Regular elimination helps remove toxins from the system. And the longer feces sit in the colon the more toxic it gets!…