Tag: butyrate

Healthy Colon Action Steps for a Happy Life!

Healthy Colon Action Steps for a Happy Life!

There are many ways to look directly at the gut connection to cancer. I believe the most important information you can receive is how to support and maintain a healthy colon. I realize now that in these four posts honoring Colon Cancer Awareness Month I have only scratched the surface of the information I would love to share with you. Over…

Gut Bacteria and Leaky Brain Syndrome

You may have already heard about leaky gut syndrome (increased intestinal permeability)—damage to the intestinal lining that creates holes through which travel toxins, bacteria, and large food particles from the digestive tract—all of which are not meant to cross the intestinal lining and can trigger an inflammatory immune response that enters systemic circulation and can manifest disease processes in virtually…

Fiber, Gut Microbes, and Inflammation

When you consider that the human colon houses many trillions of bacteria, you have to wonder at the immune system’s complexity. The intestinal lining houses the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), which makes up the majority of your immune system. And yet, even though the only separation between these bacteria and the immune system is a one-cell thick layer called the…

Gut Microbe Imbalance Linked to Colon Cancer

The gut bacteria composition of people at risk for colorectal cancer differs from that of healthy people, according to a recent study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.1 Researchers from the New York University School of Medicine analyzed stool samples from 141 patients—47 of which had colorectal cancer—and found lower bacterial diversity in patients with colon cancer.…

Butyrate and the Immune System

Some of your gut bacteria—especially the beneficial Bifidobacteria—produce an important short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) called butyrate. They do this by fermenting fiber in the digestive tract. Butyrate acts as a food for the cells of the intestinal lining, helping to maintain the integrity of this one-cell-thick layer that separates the digestive system from the rest of the body. A recent…

How Rich are Your Gut Bacteria?

There are more factors that contribute to the development of obesity and related conditions than simply what we eat and how much energy we expend. The very notion of calories in, calories out is not what it seems; at least, not at face value. As researchers are discovering, your gut microbes have more to do with your metabolism than you…

Antibiotics, PPIs, and Low-Fiber Diet Set the Stage for C. difficile infection

Four weeks ago I began a blog series on the effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on the development of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, a bacterial infection that has become more virulent and resistant to antibiotics over the last eight years.1 Today, I would like to talk about another possible contributor to C. difficile infection—a low-fiber diet. The low-fiber diet connection…

Diet Affects Changes in the Gut Microbiota

  A new study, published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, demonstrated a connection between diet, and stool pH and bacterial levels in adults.1 The researchers studied stool samples from vegetarians, vegans, and omnivores. They found lower levels of potentially pathogenic bacteria, like E. coli, in people consuming the vegan or vegetarian diets. What they also found, in conjunction,…

Prebiotics and Probiotics—A Primer

  I talk about probiotics a lot. I even have a PBS show on the topic—The Road to Perfect Health. I call your gut bacteria the Gut Protection System, or GPS. The word probiotics means, “for life.” Probiotics are defined as beneficial bacteria (sometimes yeast) that benefit the person taking them in some way. Many people relate probiotics to yogurt,…

Cracking the Gut Microbial Code: Are We There Yet?

“In the future, when you walk into a doctor’s surgery or hospital, you could be asked not just about your allergies and blood group, but also about your gut type.” This is a quote from ScienceDaily (Apr. 21, 2011) referring to a recent article in Nature Magazine. The study, published in Nature, also uncovers microbial genetic markers that are related…