Tag: C. difficile

Getting the Poop Scoop on Autism

Getting the Poop Scoop on Autism

A report in Science Daily entitled “Autism symptoms improve after fecal transplant, small study finds” caught my eye immediately. You see, in one of the episodes of my recent PBS special, Natural Health Breakthroughs with Brenda Watson, I interviewed a woman who had undergone fecal transplant with great success. She had been extremely ill with recurrent C. difficile bacterial infections…

Bacteria and the Elderly – Better Days Ahead

Bacteria and the Elderly – Better Days Ahead

Recently I was pleased to come across an article in the Wall Street Journal that discussed the very positive shift away from overuse of antibiotics in nursing homes. Being the defender of the microbiome that I am, when I read that up to 70% of nursing home residents receive one or more courses of antibiotics every year and up to…

Weight Gain After Microbiota Transplant

Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) involves the transfer of fecal material from a healthy donor to the digestive tract of an ill recipient (most commonly, someone with refractory, or difficult to manage, C. difficile diarrhea). Transplanting the gut microbiota from a healthy individual to someone with C. diff has resulted in an impressive 90+ percent cure rate of the disease. Brenda…

Proton Pump Inhibitors Decrease Gut Microbial Diversity

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are one of the most commonly prescribed medications in the United States, earning billions of dollars for pharmaceutical companies. PPIs markedly decrease the production of stomach acid as a treatment for conditions in the upper digestive tract such as acid reflux, ulcers, and Helicobacter pylori infection. While these medications are sometimes necessary in the short term,…

Probiotics for C. difficile Diarrhea

Cochrane Reviews are systematic reviews of scientific research in human health care and policy, and are known to be the most rigorous of scientific opinion. They base their analysis of dietary supplement studies very much in line with their analysis of drug studies. For this reason, Cochrane Reviews of dietary supplements are rarely positive. You see, herbs and nutrient, which…

Probiotics Reviewed for Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea

  One of the most, well-studied benefits of probiotics is the prevention of diarrhea in people taking antibiotics (a condition known as antibiotic-associated diarrhea, or AAD). A recent meta-analysis of 82 randomized controlled trials published in the Journal of the American Medical Association evaluated the effects of probiotics on AAD and found that probiotics use is associated with a 42…

Antibiotics, PPIs, and Low-Fiber Diet Set the Stage for C. difficile infection

Four weeks ago I began a blog series on the effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on the development of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, a bacterial infection that has become more virulent and resistant to antibiotics over the last eight years.1 Today, I would like to talk about another possible contributor to C. difficile infection—a low-fiber diet. The low-fiber diet connection…

Acid-suppressing Medications and Bacterial Infections

Last week the FDA issued a warning about the use of acid-suppressing medications known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and the risk of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD), a potentially life-threatening bacterial infection.1 The FDA states that in patients who develop diarrhea that does not improve, a diagnosis of CDAD should be considered. Clostridum difficile (C. diff) is a bacterium that…

Antibiotics, Probiotics or Both for C. diff?

On May 27, 2011 a New York Times article reports that Sherwood Gorbach, a 71 year doctor, has been instrumental in the development of a new antibiotic, Dificid, also known as fidaxomicin, for treating C. difficle (C. diff) diarrhea. Dr. Gorbach spent most of his professional life as professor of medicine and public health at Tufts University. He is also…

What’s Going on in Your Gut? Two Essential Tests Can Help You Find Out

Doing what I do, I have a lot of folks come to me with problems like heartburn, constipation, gas and bloating—things that make you think right off the bat, “That’s a digestive issue.” But what about problems like fatigue or weight gain? Even allergies, joint pain or skin problems? What a lot of people don’t realize is that all of these things are connected, and they all come back to your gut.

I have a new book coming out called The Road to Perfect Health, and in it I talk about the vast numbers of bacteria in your body, especially in your digestive tract (which is where roughly 80 percent of your natural defenses are found). And when a healthy digestive balance is upset because of things like poor diet, stress or other factors, the result can be not only poor digestion, but a total breakdown in health.