Tag: colon

My Own Colon Awareness Story

My Own Colon Awareness Story

Since March is Colon Cancer Awareness Month I thought I would offer a series of posts this month focused on colon health. Initially, I would like to share with you some personal challenges that led me to the conclusion that your gut is the core of your health. As the truth of this concept became more and more clear to…

Human Placenta Contains a Community of Microbes

The human microbiome is vast, accounting for 90 percent of our cells. Microbial composition varies from site to site across a range of niches in and on the body. Some niches—such as the colon—are colonized by a very high number of microbes. Other niches—such as the stomach—are colonized by lower amount of microbes. There are yet other areas of the…

New Appetite-Suppressing Benefit of Fiber Discovered

It is well known that fiber has appetite-suppressing properties. In fact, Brenda and I wrote an entire book about it—The Fiber35 Diet. Fiber works in a number of ways to suppress appetite. Fiber expands in the stomach, taking up more space, which makes you feel full. In addition, fiber slows the emptying of food from the stomach into the intestines,…

Gut Microbes Responsible for Chocolate’s Healthy Effects

One of the best things about chocolate—dark chocolate, at least—is that it’s good for you. Chocolate is known to have a number of health-promoting qualities, including heart and brain health benefits. In a recent study presented at the National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, researchers discussed their findings that certain gut microbes are responsible for some of…

Fiber, Gut Microbes, and Inflammation

When you consider that the human colon houses many trillions of bacteria, you have to wonder at the immune system’s complexity. The intestinal lining houses the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), which makes up the majority of your immune system. And yet, even though the only separation between these bacteria and the immune system is a one-cell thick layer called the…

Fecal Bacteriotherapy for Ulcerative Colitis in Children

The great success of fecal bacteriotherapy, or fecal microbial transplant (FMT), for people with recurrent C. difficile infection has researchers investigating this treatment for other digestive diseases, most notably ulcerative colitis. A recent study published in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition is the first to study this treatment in children and young adults with ulcerative colitis.1 “Colonic dysbiosis contributes to the development…

Toxins in Women of Childbearing Age

A recent study published in the journal Environmental Perspectives found that over half the women of childbearing age have higher levels of two out of three major pollutants: lead, mercury, and PCBs. Almost 23 percent of the women met or exceeded median levels of these three common toxins, known to potentially harm fetal and infant brain development. These toxins are…

Dysbiosis in IBD—Nitrates the Culprit?

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) involves dysbiosis, or an imbalance of beneficial to harmful bacteria in the intestines.1 Specifically, obligate anaerobic bacteria are depleted and the facultative anaerobic bacteria Enterobacteriacea increase. A recent study has found one way in which this dysbiosis develops.2 Researchers from UC Davis discovered that the potentially harmful Enterobacteriacea—specifically, E. coli—use nitrate to grow. Nitrate is formed…

Gut Inflammation – Dysbiosis – Colon Cancer

Gut inflammation is known to be a risk factor for the development of colon cancer. A recent study published in the journal Science has traced back the steps from colon cancer only to discover that gut inflammation triggers a decrease in gut microbial diversity that allows pathogens to flourish and damage intestinal cells, leading to the development of cancer. The…