Tag: dysbiosis

Healthy Colon Action Steps for a Happy Life!

Healthy Colon Action Steps for a Happy Life!

There are many ways to look directly at the gut connection to cancer. I believe the most important information you can receive is how to support and maintain a healthy colon. I realize now that in these four posts honoring Colon Cancer Awareness Month I have only scratched the surface of the information I would love to share with you. Over…

Changes in Gut Microbiome Precede Development of Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes involves the inability of beta cells in the pancreas to produce insulin, the hormone that regulates blood sugar levels. As a result, people with type 1 diabetes must take insulin injections and carefully monitor their food intake to properly regulate blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes is most commonly diagnosed during childhood in children who are genetically predisposed…

Ancestral Microbiome May Hold Key to Modern Health

Although scientists are hard at work studying the human gut microbiome, the complexity of the task is such that we still know very little about the trillions of microbes that live in and on us—and on whom we are intricately dependent. In a recent article published in the Journal of Human Evolution, researchers suggest that by studying the gut microbiome…

Day-Night Cycles Affect Gut Balance

Only over the last century have humans been exposed to such a huge alteration in the sleep-wake cycle that, previously, was dependent only upon the revolution of the earth in relation to the sun. With the advent of lighting and airplanes, the rhythms of daily life have changed for most of us, and have changed drastically for some of us…

Artificial Sweeteners Raise Blood Sugar via Changes in Gut Bacteria

Artificial sweeteners—the likes of saccharine (the pink packets), aspartame (the blue packets), and sucralose (the yellow packets)—were created as an alternative to caloric sweeteners like sugar and honey, which contribute to raised blood sugar and the development of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Artificial sweeteners are added to a wide range of commonly consumed foods such as diet sodas,…

Probiotic Bacteria Reverse Autistic Behaviors

Introduction of the probiotic bacteria Bacteroides fragilis into the digestive tract improves gastrointestinal function and behavioral symptoms in an animal model, suggesting that the bacteria may be a potential probiotic therapy in humans with neurodevelopmental disorders, according to a recent study published in the journal Cell.1 This study has particular implications for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), but the researchers say…

Probiotics Ease Stress-Induced Gut Inflammation

When you experience stress, especially on a regular basis, gut-brain interactions result in a decrease of inflammasomes—immune compounds that help maintain gut bacterial balance. This is one way stress leads to gut imbalance, or dysbiosis—an imbalance in the ratio of good to bad bacteria in the gut. Chronic stress is almost the norm in today’s world, however. So how can…

Fecal Bacteriotherapy for Ulcerative Colitis in Children

The great success of fecal bacteriotherapy, or fecal microbial transplant (FMT), for people with recurrent C. difficile infection has researchers investigating this treatment for other digestive diseases, most notably ulcerative colitis. A recent study published in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition is the first to study this treatment in children and young adults with ulcerative colitis.1 “Colonic dysbiosis contributes to the development…

Silent Inflammation Linked to Depression

Silent inflammation is a chronic, low-grade inflammation that exists in the body in such a way that you don’t really see it or feel it. When silent inflammation persists it can trigger a host of negative health effects. In fact, inflammation is involved in most, if not all, chronic disease. A relatively recent discovery is the role silent inflammation plays…

RePOOPulating the Gut

The story unfolding about Clostridium difficile (C. diff for short) infection is one I pay close attention to. There is no effective treatment for recurrent C. diff infection, which puts this population at higher risk of complications, including death. In fact, it was recently announced that C. diff infection is now the ninth leading cause of gastrointestinal death, showing a…