Tag: E. coli

Probiotic Bacteria Prevent Weight Gain in Mice

The connection between gut bacteria and weight gain is a subject of great interest among researchers. It’s a topic of great interest to me, too! The search is on for probiotic therapies that prevent weight gain. In a recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Vanderbilt University researchers discovered a protective effect against weight gain of a genetically…

Dysbiosis in IBD—Nitrates the Culprit?

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) involves dysbiosis, or an imbalance of beneficial to harmful bacteria in the intestines.1 Specifically, obligate anaerobic bacteria are depleted and the facultative anaerobic bacteria Enterobacteriacea increase. A recent study has found one way in which this dysbiosis develops.2 Researchers from UC Davis discovered that the potentially harmful Enterobacteriacea—specifically, E. coli—use nitrate to grow. Nitrate is formed…

Gut Inflammation – Dysbiosis – Colon Cancer

Gut inflammation is known to be a risk factor for the development of colon cancer. A recent study published in the journal Science has traced back the steps from colon cancer only to discover that gut inflammation triggers a decrease in gut microbial diversity that allows pathogens to flourish and damage intestinal cells, leading to the development of cancer. The…

Breast Milk—And Not Infant Formula—Promotes Beneficial Biofilm

Bacteria in the digestive tract exist in two main ways—First, within a polysaccharide matrix known as a biofilm that adheres to the intestinal lining or to digestive contents, or second, floating in a non-adherent manner as single cells. In the natural world, 99 percent of all bacteria exist as biofilms,1 so the study of biofilms in the gut is proving…

Diet Affects Changes in the Gut Microbiota

  A new study, published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, demonstrated a connection between diet, and stool pH and bacterial levels in adults.1 The researchers studied stool samples from vegetarians, vegans, and omnivores. They found lower levels of potentially pathogenic bacteria, like E. coli, in people consuming the vegan or vegetarian diets. What they also found, in conjunction,…

Chicken Wings and a UTI

  I recommend eating natural foods all the time because I know foods that don’t contain toxic ingredients are better for our bodies. If you eat meat, choose natural meats from animals that haven’t been treated with growth hormones and antibiotics. Now there are even more good reasons to go all-natural. A recent study found certain strains of E. coli…

Getting Fat? It’s in Your Gut

To me, a very interesting gut connection is that of microbial gut balance to obesity, a condition plaguing one-third of Americans. Studies are very new on this subject of the link between the gut and obesity. In fact, there have only been a few. But boy are they changing how the world looks at the gut—namely, they’re really starting to…

Taking Antibiotics for a Bad Cold? Not so Good.

Over-prescription of antibiotics contributes to antibiotic resistance and affects the ability of bacteria to survive antibiotic treatment.  That’s very important because if antibiotics do not work for infections, there isn’t much else that will.  Now that’s scary! A recent study of patients hospitalized for respiratory infections found that in those who were diagnosed with a viral infection (antibiotics will not…

Poo Bacteria in Your Soda Pop?!

As if you need another reason to not drink soda, now scientists tell us there’s poop bacteria in those fizzy beverages Americans love so much! I thought this story was just plain gross, but it’s definitely one that a lot of readers need to hear (you know who you are, soda drinkers!) A recent study found fecal bacteria in 48…