Tag: gut microbes

Gut Microbes Linked to Alcohol Dependence

The intestinal lining is a protective interface between the digestive tract and the rest of the internal organs and systems. It is a semi-permeable lining that, when healthy, lets in small digested nutrients and keeps out larger undigested food particles and pathogens. When the intestinal lining is damaged, a condition known as increased intestinal permeability or leaky gut usually due…

Ultra-Low Diversity of Gut Microbes During Critical Illness

The intestinal tract is a main source of health-care associated pathogenic infections, not surprisingly due to the high concentration of microbes residing there.1 The GI tract is also considered to the primary reservoir for the emergence of antibiotic resistance of such infections.2 In patients with prolonged critical illness, the risk of developing a gut-derived sepsis (blood infection) is increased. In…

Obesity During Pregnancy Affects Gut Microbes in Offspring

Obesity during pregnancy has a number of detrimental effects. Not only does it negatively affect the mother by increasing the risk of gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, infections, sleep apnea, and even infertility in the first place, but it also has harmful effects on the baby, including problems with labor and the increased risk of obesity, heart disease, and diabetes later in…

Low-Dose Antibiotics During Early Infancy Trigger Obesity Later in Life

Early life is a critical development period in many respects, and particularly as it relates to gut microbial composition. Even before birth, gut microbes are transferred from mother to fetus, a transfer that continues during birth and later via breast milk. Once established, gut microbes in the infant play a protective role on the infant’s health. A disturbance of gut…

Are Your Gut Microbes to Blame for Your Cravings?

In my new book and upcoming public television show, The Skinny Gut Diet, I talk at length about how gut microbes are in control of your health, and how your particular gut balance determines whether or not you will gain weight. Although it seems farfetched at first, everything seems to finally make sense once you realize that you are not…

Gut Bacteria in Children with Autism Are Different

There is a distinct connection between changes in gut bacteria and autism, a topic I have written and blogged about before. A recent study presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology found that children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have different concentrations of bacterial metabolites, or chemicals produced by bacteria, in their stool when compared to…

Immature Microbes in the Guts of Malnourished Children

Malnutrition (severe or moderate acute malnutrition) affects 23 percent of children in developing countries.1 The World Health Organization estimates that malnutrition is the cause of one-third of all child deaths.2 Malnutrition, or inadequate nutrition, manifests most noticeably as delayed growth, but also includes deficiencies in vitamins, minerals, essential fatty acids, and protein. A recently developed intervention for severe acute malnutrition,…

Diet & Sleep Habits Linked to Inflammation – 4 Important Diet Tips

Clinical studies continue to link chronic, low-grade inflammation—also known as silent inflammation—with a growing number of health conditions and diseases. Because it can be present without being felt, this type of inflammation is particularly dangerous and can be harmful to the body over time. Recently, a team of scientists from Texas A&M University found a link between our internal “body…

Gut Microbes in a Hunter-Gatherer Community

Researchers are hard at working trying to characterize the human gut microbiome, the community of microbes that live within the digestive tract of humans, mostly concentrated within the colon. A number of studies have begun to classify the microbes found in people of the Western world, and a few studies have even classified the microbes found in rural populations in…