Tag: intestinal lining

Gut Microbes Linked to Alcohol Dependence

The intestinal lining is a protective interface between the digestive tract and the rest of the internal organs and systems. It is a semi-permeable lining that, when healthy, lets in small digested nutrients and keeps out larger undigested food particles and pathogens. When the intestinal lining is damaged, a condition known as increased intestinal permeability or leaky gut usually due…

Gut Bacteria and Leaky Brain Syndrome

You may have already heard about leaky gut syndrome (increased intestinal permeability)—damage to the intestinal lining that creates holes through which travel toxins, bacteria, and large food particles from the digestive tract—all of which are not meant to cross the intestinal lining and can trigger an inflammatory immune response that enters systemic circulation and can manifest disease processes in virtually…

Leaky Gut in Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease that involves an immune system attack of the protective sheath (myelin sheath) that covers nerves. This destruction has a damaging effect on the communication between the brain and the rest of the body. The disease process varies widely per person, ranging from symptoms of weakness, tingling, numbness, blurred vision, muscle stiffness, and difficult thinking…

Probiotics Reduce Bowel Disease in Premature Babies

Premature infants given a daily dose of a probiotic blend were protected against the more severe forms of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a potentially deadly inflammatory disease, according to a recent study published in the journal Pediatrics. NEC is the most common gastrointestinal emergency in premature infants. It involves damage to the intestinal lining that ranges from surface damage all the…

Butyrate and the Immune System

Some of your gut bacteria—especially the beneficial Bifidobacteria—produce an important short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) called butyrate. They do this by fermenting fiber in the digestive tract. Butyrate acts as a food for the cells of the intestinal lining, helping to maintain the integrity of this one-cell-thick layer that separates the digestive system from the rest of the body. A recent…

Eat Your Greens for Better Gut Health

We all know we’re supposed to eat our greens. Broccoli, kale, collards—these dark green vegetables are part of the cruciferous family, and have been linked to a number of beneficial effects on health. A recent study published in the journal Nature Immunity found that a particular gene (T-bet) controls the development of recently discovered immune cells in the intestinal lining…

The Gut Connection—Leaky Gut—Supported by Dr. Oz

I have to admit, after all these years of spreading the message of the gut connection to total-body health, to hear my message coming from Dr. Oz was certainly gratifying. Just last week his show covered the condition that epitomizes the gut connection to chronic disease—leaky gut syndrome. You can watch the show, in three segments here: http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/medical-mystery-solved-pt-1 http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/medical-mystery-solved-pt-2 http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/medical-mystery-solved-pt-3…

Is Your Diet AGE-ing You?

The term advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is a mouthful for a group of compounds that are formed both in the body and in food by the reaction between sugars with proteins and lipids (fats). The sugars literally coat proteins and lipids, which causes them to not function well. In addition, these adulterated, now “new to nature” molecules are not…

Could Sucralose Cause IBD?

  An interesting article was published last September in the Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology, in which the author hypothesized that sucralose (brand name Splenda) might be the cause of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The disease emerged in the past century, and was most prevalent in Western countries like the United Kingdom, the United States, and in northern Europe. Interestingly, prevalence…