Tag: intestines

Probiotics for Fatty Liver Disease

The liver is the body’s powerhouse of detoxification. The main function of the liver is to filter blood that comes directly from the intestines to the liver via the portal vein. The health of the liver, therefore, is very much dependent on the health of the gut. The intestinal lining is the main interface between the immune system and the…

Probiotics for Common Cold in Healthy Adults

Probiotics are live microorganisms that, when taken in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host (that’s you). Probiotics are most known for their digestive benefits because the digestive tract is where they work. Not everyone is aware that probiotics also have important immune health benefits, primarily because up to 80 percent of the immune system resides in the…

Dysbiosis in IBD—Nitrates the Culprit?

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) involves dysbiosis, or an imbalance of beneficial to harmful bacteria in the intestines.1 Specifically, obligate anaerobic bacteria are depleted and the facultative anaerobic bacteria Enterobacteriacea increase. A recent study has found one way in which this dysbiosis develops.2 Researchers from UC Davis discovered that the potentially harmful Enterobacteriacea—specifically, E. coli—use nitrate to grow. Nitrate is formed…

Probiotics Boost Gut Health in Athletes

Gastrointestinal complaints such as nausea, cramps, vomiting, and diarrhea are common among athletes. This is thought to be due to the change in blood flow during intense exercise—blood is diverted from digestion to the heart and muscles where it is needed. The decrease in blood flow to the intestines during intense exercise is known to increase intestinal permeability, or leaky…

Diet Affects Changes in the Gut Microbiota

  A new study, published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, demonstrated a connection between diet, and stool pH and bacterial levels in adults.1 The researchers studied stool samples from vegetarians, vegans, and omnivores. They found lower levels of potentially pathogenic bacteria, like E. coli, in people consuming the vegan or vegetarian diets. What they also found, in conjunction,…

Vitamin D and IBD

  Inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD, is characterized by inflammation of the intestines, and is most notably represented as Crohn’s disease, which usually affects the small intestine, but may affect other areas of the digestive tract, and ulcerative colitis, which usually affects the large intestine, or colon. Two recent studies, presented at the American College of Gastroenterology’s 76th Annual Scientific…

Probiotics and the Gut-Brain Axis

  The gut-brain axis involves the connection of the gut to the brain. This connection goes in both directions—from the brain to the gut and from the gut to the brain. In one way, the gut-brain axis is connected by the vagus nerve—a large nerve connecting the brain to the intestines and other organs. The vagus nerve both sends messages…

Leaky Gut Associated with Belly Fat

Belly fat, or visceral adipose tissue (VAT), is the fat that accumulates around the organs in the abdomen. It is strongly related to metabolic disorders including insulin resistance, fatty liver and inflammation. Because of the close proximity of belly fat to the intestines, and the ability of gut bacterial toxins to affect inflammation outside the gut, the relationship of increased…

Acid-Suppressing Drugs Damage the Gut

Renew You Challenge Let’s start this week off right! Weekly challenge (I mean opportunity!) to help set you off on the right foot and in the right direction for bringing health to your week. You could even add it to your calendar. Join us! Many people who have arthritis take non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to manage pain. NSAIDs can wreak…