Tag: microbes

Feeling Sexy? It Could Be Microbes!

Feeling Sexy? It Could Be Microbes!

Here’s a different twist on Valentine’s Day! Your attraction to your sexy mate may have less to do with the clothes he/she wears, the sweet nothings he/she whispers and the chocolates he/she buys for you – and much more to do with his/her particular microbes! While flourishing science is replete with the fabulous abilities of microbes – everything from supporting…

Weight Gain After Microbiota Transplant

Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) involves the transfer of fecal material from a healthy donor to the digestive tract of an ill recipient (most commonly, someone with refractory, or difficult to manage, C. difficile diarrhea). Transplanting the gut microbiota from a healthy individual to someone with C. diff has resulted in an impressive 90+ percent cure rate of the disease. Brenda…

Ancestral Microbiome May Hold Key to Modern Health

Although scientists are hard at work studying the human gut microbiome, the complexity of the task is such that we still know very little about the trillions of microbes that live in and on us—and on whom we are intricately dependent. In a recent article published in the Journal of Human Evolution, researchers suggest that by studying the gut microbiome…

Day-Night Cycles Affect Gut Balance

Only over the last century have humans been exposed to such a huge alteration in the sleep-wake cycle that, previously, was dependent only upon the revolution of the earth in relation to the sun. With the advent of lighting and airplanes, the rhythms of daily life have changed for most of us, and have changed drastically for some of us…

Your Microbes and Your Home

On and in your body, at this very moment, are living over 100 trillion microbes working together—hopefully—to help protect you from disease. From person to person, these microbes differ, although certain core sets of bacteria groups tend to be common across all people. While many researchers are hard at work advancing our knowledge about the microbes covering our skin and…

Ultra-Low Diversity of Gut Microbes During Critical Illness

The intestinal tract is a main source of health-care associated pathogenic infections, not surprisingly due to the high concentration of microbes residing there.1 The GI tract is also considered to the primary reservoir for the emergence of antibiotic resistance of such infections.2 In patients with prolonged critical illness, the risk of developing a gut-derived sepsis (blood infection) is increased. In…

Diverse Gut Bacteria Linked to Better Estrogen Metabolite Levels

The diversity of your gut bacteria refers to the abundance of different types of microbes. As a rule, the more diverse your gut microbes, the healthier you are. A recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism further supports this idea. Researchers from the National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute discovered that gut bacterial diversity may…

High-Carbohydrate Diet Triggers Colon Cancer

Studies have linked the high-carbohydrate Western diet to colorectal cancer, but scientists have been unsure of just how carbs may trigger the development of the disease. In a recent study published in the journal Cell, researchers discovered that microbes inside the gut are able to metabolize carbohydrates from food in such a way that causes intestinal cells to form tumors.…

Bacteria and the Skin

When someone talks about the bacteria that are found in and on the human body, the conversation usually turns to the gut because that is where the majority of these microbes are found. But the skin is an often overlooked habitat for a large diversity of microbes that are only recently being recognized as important for human health. In a…

Human Placenta Contains a Community of Microbes

The human microbiome is vast, accounting for 90 percent of our cells. Microbial composition varies from site to site across a range of niches in and on the body. Some niches—such as the colon—are colonized by a very high number of microbes. Other niches—such as the stomach—are colonized by lower amount of microbes. There are yet other areas of the…