Tag: microbes

Antibiotics in Agriculture Impacting Microbes in Soil

The use of antibiotics in raising livestock is widespread, so much so that it’s added as a growth promoter to the drinking water of many animals. As a result of overuse, the antibiotics are excreted from these animals in manure and urine, which results in the deposit of antibiotics into the soil. A recent study published in the Public Library…

Quick Facts and 9 Simple Tips for IBS Awareness Month

April is IBS Awareness Month—a time for individuals and communities across the country to spread awareness about irritable bowel syndrome and the millions of Americans it affects every day. Coast to coast, activities and events are in the works to help people understand this debilitating disorder, its signs and symptoms, and how it is diagnosed and treated. Quick Facts about…

Fermented Food and Mental Health—Gut Microbes are the Missing Link

Fermented foods have been a part of the diet even before humans knew about the existence of microbes—the very organisms that make fermentation possible. Our Paleolithic ancestors consumed honey, fruits, and fruit juices in fermented form without awareness of the trillions of microscopic beings they were concurrently ingesting. Even as long ago as 10,000 years, humans were deliberately fermenting foods…

Gut Microbes in Children Carry Numerous Antibiotic Resistance Genes

The microbes inside digestive tracts of healthy children have many antibiotic resistance genes, according to a recent study published in the Public Library of Sciences ONE journal. These genes may place the children at higher risk of developing resistance to antibiotic treatments. “From birth to age 5, children receive more antibiotics than during any other five-year time span in their…

Probiotics for Common Cold in Healthy Adults

Probiotics are live microorganisms that, when taken in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host (that’s you). Probiotics are most known for their digestive benefits because the digestive tract is where they work. Not everyone is aware that probiotics also have important immune health benefits, primarily because up to 80 percent of the immune system resides in the…

A Glimpse of How Gut Infections Develop after Antibiotics

Antibiotics work by killing not only the harmful bacteria, but also the beneficial bacteria. It is relatively common for antibiotics to lead to gut infections that arise because potentially pathogenic bacteria are no longer kept in check by the beneficial microbes that inhabit the gut. “Antibiotics open the door for these pathogens to take hold. But how, exactly, that occurs…

Is Alzheimer’s the Result of Living in a Too-Clean World?

Modern life in all its cleanliness—clean buildings, sanitizer, antibacterial everything and a “don’t touch that” attitude—is thought to be contributing to the increased prevalence of allergic and autoimmune diseases found in developed countries. (This concept is known as the hygiene hypothesis.) Contrast this with developing countries where children still play in the dirt, antibacterial soap is reserved for medical use,…

Banned Antibiotics Found In Chicken

In 2005 the FDA banned the use of a particular broad-spectrum (meaning effective against a broad range of microbes) antibiotic class—the fluoroquinolones—due to an alarming increase in the rate of resistance to Campylobacter bacteria. Yet, “In recent years, we’ve seen the rate of fluoroquinolone resistance slow, but not drop. With such a ban you would expect a decline in resistance…

Your Gut and Your Happiness

The gut-brain connection is among one of the most fascinating gut connections I have come across—and there are many gut connections. To think that what goes on in the gut can affect what goes on in our brains might seem unfathomable, but it’s true. I have blogged on it before—a number of times. A lot of research is still needed…

The Human Microbiome Project

The Human Microbiome Project is a five-year research collaboration between 200 scientists at 80 universities and scientific institutions, all funded with $153 million by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) with the aim of, “characterizing the microbial communities found at several different sites on the human body, including nasal passages, oral cavities, skin, gastrointestinal tract, and urogenital tract, and to…