Tag: microbiota

Changes in Gut Microbiome Precede Development of Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes involves the inability of beta cells in the pancreas to produce insulin, the hormone that regulates blood sugar levels. As a result, people with type 1 diabetes must take insulin injections and carefully monitor their food intake to properly regulate blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes is most commonly diagnosed during childhood in children who are genetically predisposed…

Low-Dose Antibiotics During Early Infancy Trigger Obesity Later in Life

Early life is a critical development period in many respects, and particularly as it relates to gut microbial composition. Even before birth, gut microbes are transferred from mother to fetus, a transfer that continues during birth and later via breast milk. Once established, gut microbes in the infant play a protective role on the infant’s health. A disturbance of gut…

Gut Microbes Help Develop Immune Cells

Our gut microbes play a crucial role in the development of immune cells that help fight infection, according to a recent study by researchers from the California Institute of Technology and published in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. They began the study by comparing innate immune cells—white blood cells that act as the body’s first line of defense against…

How Rich are Your Gut Bacteria?

There are more factors that contribute to the development of obesity and related conditions than simply what we eat and how much energy we expend. The very notion of calories in, calories out is not what it seems; at least, not at face value. As researchers are discovering, your gut microbes have more to do with your metabolism than you…

Dietary Guidelines Should Focus on Getting More Probiotics

In order for Americans to really change their diets and improve their health, foods that are available in grocery stores—and the information people receive about these foods—must change. That’s why I found it hopeful when I read that Mary Ellen Sanders, PhD, writing on behalf of the International Scientific Association of Probiotics and Prebiotics, commented that the 2015 Dietary Guidelines…

Gut Balance with the Right Microbes + Healthy Diet = Lean Individual

The link between gut microbial composition and obesity is one of the most fascinating gut links currently being studied. Jeffrey Gordon’s lab at Washington University in St. Louis has consistently produced cutting-edge research that is taking our understanding of the integral role of gut balance—and its interaction with diet—on the development of obesity to fascinating places. In yet another ground-breaking…

The Gut-Brain Connection of Depression to C. difficile Infection

Clostridium difficile infection is linked to 14,000 deaths each year in the United States and continues to increase each year.1 Antibiotic use is the major cause of C. diff infection, but other medications are known to increase risk, including proton-pump inhibitors and h-2 blockers, which are both stomach acid-blocking medications. Another class of drugs that is coming to light as…

Gut Bacteria Balance Affects Response to Vaccination

As we have seen over the last few years, our gut microbes (also called gut microbiota or microbiome) impact our health in multitudinous ways, from gut health to brain health, immune health to heart health, and everything in between. Recently, researchers conducted two studies that identified a link between gut microbiota composition and response to vaccination. The studies were a…

Mother’s Gut Balance Determines Baby’s Gut Balance

Gut bacterial balance during pregnancy—especially toward the end of pregnancy—is crucial because when a baby is born through the birth canal, the bacteria colonizing the mother are transferred to the infant where they begin to colonize the digestive tract. So, when a mother has a healthy balance of gut bacteria, baby will too, and vice versa. A recent study by…

Gut Microbes and L-carnitine—Good or Bad for You?

A recent study has got many people talking about the potential benefits—or detriments, depending which side you’re on—of L-carnitine for heart health. The study, by Cleveland Clinic and published in Nature Medicine, found a link between increased blood levels of TMAO (trimethylamine N-oxide, a metabolite of L-carnitine produced in the gut by certain bacteria) and an increased risk of cardiovascular…